The Parc Olympique Lyonnais, nicknamed the Parc OL, is a 59,186-seat stadium in Décines-Charpieu, close to Lyon. Its other name is Stade des Lumières, named after Lumière brothers who invented moving pictures.

The Parc des Princes is an all-seater football stadium in Paris, France. The venue is located in the south-west of the French capital, inside the 16th arrondissement of Paris, in the immediate vicinity of the Stade Jean-Bouin (rugby venue) and within walking distance from the Stade Roland Garros (tennis venue).

The stadium, with a seating capacity of 48,583 spectators, has been the home pitch of Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain since 1974. Before the opening of the Stade de France in 1998, it was also the home arena of the French national football and rugby union teams. The Parc des Princes pitch is surrounded by four covered all-seater stands, officially known as the Présidentielle Francis Borelli, Auteuil, Paris and Boulogne Stands.

The Allianz Riviera is a multi-use stadium in Nice, France, used mostly for football matches of host OGC Nice and also for occasional home matches of rugby union club Toulon. The stadium has a capacity of 35,624 people and replaces the city's former stadium Stade Municipal du Ray. Construction started in 2011 and was completed two years later. The stadium's opening was on 22 September 2013, for a match between OGC Nice and Valenciennes.

Stade de la Mosson is a football stadium in Montpellier, France. It is the home of Montpellier HSC (Ligue 1) and has a capacity of 32,900. Formerly a 16,000-seater stadium, it was entirely rebuilt in 1998 to host 6 games of the 1998 FIFA World Cup. It was also used as a venue for group stage matches in the 2007 Rugby World Cup.

The Roazhon Park, until 2015 named Stade de la Route de Lorient, is a football stadium in Rennes, Brittany, France. Roazhon means Rennes in Breton.  The stadium was inaugurated on 15 September 1912. It is located at 111 route de Lorient, in west-central Rennes. Rebuilt in 2001 and able to seat 29,778, the stadium is currently the home of Stade Rennais.

The stadium has hosted France men's and women's national football team matches. On 19-20 June 2016 it hosted the semifinals of the Top 14 rugby union tournament. It has also been selected as a venue for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, in which it will host six matches—four in the group stage, one in the round of 16, and one semifinal.

The Stade Océane is a football stadium in Le Havre, France. Its capacity is 25,178 all-seated and it is the home ground of Le Havre AC. It replaces the Stade Jules Deschaseaux as the club's home stadium. Its inauguration was 12 July 2012, with a friendly fixture between Le Havre AC and Lille. A similar stadium has been built in Haifa by KSS Architects.

Stade du Hainaut is a multi-use stadium in Valenciennes, France. It is used mostly for football matches and hosts the home matches of Valenciennes FC. It has replaced the Stade Nungesser as VAFC's home stadium. The stadium has a capacity of 25,000 spectators for football matches, but its capacity can be extended to 35,000 for concerts.

The stadium was constructed at a total cost of 75 million euros. It contains 2,600 club seats and 16 luxury boxes. It has two giant video screens, each 48 square meters in size. Its roof contains 1,800 tons of steel.

The Stade Auguste-Delaune is a multi-use stadium in Reims, France. It is used mostly for football matches and hosts the home matches of Stade Reims.

The Stade des Alpes is a rugby and football stadium in Grenoble, France. The stadium seats 20,068 and hosts the home games of Grenoble Foot 38 and the FC Grenoble rugby club. Situated in Paul Mistral Park, it replaced their stadium Stade Lesdiguières. It was built while GF38 played in the top divisions of French football, and had become somewhat of a white elephant now that the club plays in the 4th division and attracts few fans. However, the stadium gained greater viability once FC Grenoble earned their most recent promotion to the Top 14 in 2012. Since 2014–15, with FC Grenoble now consolidated in Top 14, the club have changed their primary home from their traditional ground, Stade Lesdiguières, to Stade des Alpes.

This stadium uses solar panels and produces more than 70,000 kWh per year.